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for the full hour. jimmy williams. and michelle caruso-cabrera. ann coulter, i know you think i'm nuts but i'm telling you the stock market is a great signal. the republicans won on the sequester. obama's poll are down so now he's having to come to the negotiation table. i like this story. i want to be optimistic about this story. >> um, i want to be optimistic too. but i want to be realist jig. all,000 are the financial maven and i would normally defer to you, that's the only thing i'm pessimistic about. i think the economy -- i would not count on the stock market continuing to go up. i know nothing about it. i just don't think that what's happening in the company justifies it. people don't have any other place to put their money. i do think people will get fed up with obama. one thing i'm very optimistic about which i was not before, i thought if we didn't repeal obama care in the next four years, if romney didn't win we would never repeal it. you are starting hear, you saw the donna brazil tweet i can't believe my insurance company just raised my rates. bad things are going to happen as o
this evening, let's go live to cnbc chief international correspondent, michelle caruso cabrera who joins us from cyprus with the details. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: good evening, larry. it's been a day of high drama here in cyprus. just a few hours ago, the parliament resoundingly rejected the idea of taking money from bank deposits here in order to secure a bailout. the rest of europe groan. protest yourself, however, cheered. now they have to get back to work tomorrow, come up with a plan b., how are they going to get 5.8 billion euros, that's what they have to do to get another $10 billion in loans from the european partners in order to resolve the situation of their near-busted banks. also adding to the drama today, the finance minister tried to resign. it's not clear why. the president wouldn't let him. and then he immediately left for russia. as you mentioned, to try to secure some kind of help, maybe in exchange for natural gas rights. at minimum, they would just like easier terms on a loan that russia gave two years ago. the banks are supposed to reopen thursday but increa
's get the latest on the cyprus report. michelle joins us by phone. >> good evening. the details are changing, but the one core fact important to investors is true. for the first time ever in the european crisis, portions of bank accounts will be seized in order to pay for a bailout. cyprus agreed to this to get a 10 billion euro loan to bail out their banks. what is still unclear and controversial is whether insured deposits will also be seized. original plan was if you had an account in cyprus with less than 100,000 euros, would you have to pay a tax even though it falls below the insurance threshold. even though in theory it was supposed to be 100% guaranteed by the state. that turned out to be so controversial they are second-guessing themselves and reconsidering. a few hours ago the minister put out a statement saying they thought the smaller depositors should be protected. that doesn't mean they will, however, because cyprus has to figure out some way to contribute to this bailout. they would have to tax the biggest depositors, the russians even more than the 10%. they are
in cyprus getting worse today, banks will not open until next week at the he earliest. good evening michelle. >> larry, another day, another attempt to try to come up with a rescue plan for cyprus, today cyprus suggested that they would try to raid a pension fund, and promise to pay the workers down the road. but that idea was not liked. additionally they are trying get money from trussia. there's a deep and close relationship with russia, they are trying to come up with a deal or a bailout. so far they are empty handed. in the meantime the banks are closed. the european central bank is flying in cash so the ats have money, they can only do it for so long. they can not under insolvent banks. and two of the banks are clearly insolvent. so they have a choice of shutting down a couple of banks or leaving the euro. >> as michelle said, the big part of the story is russia. will russia rescue cyrus and their own tax laundering haven. steve is in moscow. >> reporter: yes they came to russia looking for financial support for their country after they brokered a deal in the terms of the european union
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